Richard George Gilliatt

Originally from a village in Lincolnshire, I became interested in the study of Urban Design during my undergraduate degree in Architecture and Urban Planning at Newcastle, both through the content of the course and a discovered fascination in the way the city handled all aspects of life. This concept of the liveable city is of particular interest to me and designing for social inclusivity and environmental responsibility underpins all the work I do.


Comment on: Public Housing In Singapore

Thanks Sutong for the insight into the way in which public housing is handled in Singapore, the sheer amount of the population living in these HBD flats gives a clear idea of the rapid pace at which Singapore has expanded. I am impressed by the policy set in motion to limit segregation as this outright…
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Comment on: The Lowline; New Dimensions to City Growth

This post highlighted a concept which I hadn’t seen before and it was one that stuck in my head, thanks Ben for bringing this to light. On the topic of the Lowline project I’m torn, on the one hand the reclamation of unused space appeals to my advocacy for brownfield development and the regeneration of…
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Comment on: When do we start preparing for the future and that odd design competition?

Thanks Winnie, I share your sentiments with regards to the appropriation of greenfield land for housing development. While I understand its apparent necessity, it seems wrong to not first consider alternative approaches to meet housing demand. I would remark however that given the continuation of this trend it seems clear that the National Planning Policy…
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Comment on: The Late Shows, Cultural Event

Thanks for sharing your experiences of the Late Shows Harley, this post brought to mind the concept of areas which develop their own cultural identity, as well as the threats that are often associated with this. It is clear from your post that there is a strong creative community in Ouseburn which has developed over…
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Turning Housing on its Head? Lessons from Chimney Pot Park.

Chimney Pot Park is a 2007 Urban Splash development designed by architects ShedKM, who aimed to regenerate derelict terraced housing in Salford at a total cost of £88million (Urban Splash, 2007) Design A unique approach to terraced design saw the internal layouts flipped upside down, with living room and kitchens on the upper floors and…
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Historical studies in Flexible Housing

Flexibility in housing design is a theme that has seen a resurgence in recent years, with projects such as the Future Homes scheme in Newcastle relying heavily on this concept of buildings, which can develop and adapt to meet their users changing needs. However, that is not to say that this is a modern phenomenon….
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Clean Energy and Sustainable Communities

Why Sustainable Communities? Sustainability is one of the key driving factors in all aspects of modern governance, planning and design, investment in the clean energy sector multiplied six times between 2004 and 2017, (Bloomberg), and Greening Government Commitments introduced in the UK in 2011 set about clear environmental targets for central government (HM Government, 2012)….
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BUILDING FOR LIFE 12: SINCLAIR MEADOWS

Building for Life is a tool used to assess the quality of residential design. Through twelve distinct criteria, neighbourhoods are rated on a simple traffic light system to allow for a more inclusive form of urban design, with settlements achieving nine or more greens eligible for “Built for Life” accreditation. This is an incredibly useful…
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Comment on “Privately Owned ‘Public’ Space”

This post gave an excellent view into the increasing privatisation of public space. I agree with your argument that this land ownership by private companies is often deceptive in its implementation, and your example of Occupy London gives an insightful view into what can happen when these companies exert their control. However, your writing also…
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Urban Design with Mental Well-being in Mind

Tim Townsends lecture on the ways in which Urban Design can influence societies health and well-being provided an interesting insight into the ways into the way attitudes towards this have changed over time. I was most interested in the ways in which historically the relationship between health and place has been much more pronounced. Wendy…
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